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Life and death in London's East End: 2000 years at Spitalfields

Life and death in London's East End: 2000 years at Spitalfields PDF Author:
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Life and death in London's East End: 2000 years at Spitalfields

Life and death in London's East End: 2000 years at Spitalfields PDF Author:
Publisher:
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London

London PDF Author: Bridget Cherry
Publisher: Yale University Press
ISBN: 9780300107012
Category : Reference
Languages : en
Pages : 864

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The contribution of successive generations of immigrants is reflected in the variety of places of worship and cultural centres, from chapels to synagogues and mosques, while a century of social housing has produced innovative planning and architecture, now itself of historic interest." "This volume covers the boroughs of Barking and Dagenham, Havering, Newham, Redbridge, Tower Hamlets, and Waltham Forest. For each area there is a detailed gazetteer and historical introduction. A general introduction provides an historical overview. Numerous maps and plans, over one hundred specially taken photographs and full indexes make this volume invaluable as both reference work and guide."--Jacket.

The Little History of the East End

The Little History of the East End PDF Author: Dee Gordon
Publisher: The History Press
ISBN: 0750995785
Category : History
Languages : en
Pages : 192

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The modern history of London’s East End has been well-documented – but what of its ancient roots? From embryonic beginnings in the Stone Age, through Roman rule and civil wars, all the way to its jam-packed twentieth-century timeline, the East End has always been a place of innovation, diversity and change. Written by an East Ender with a love of her roots, The Little History of the East End is an engaging look at the area’s history through the people that made it, one that will enthral and surprise both residents and visitors alike.

Spitalfields

Spitalfields PDF Author: Dan Cruickshank
Publisher: Random House
ISBN: 1448164567
Category : History
Languages : en
Pages : 784

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SHORTLISTED FOR THE HESSELL-TILTMAN HISTORY PRIZE 2017 AN OBSERVER BOOK OF THE YEAR 2016 Religious strife, civil conflict, waves of immigration, the rise and fall of industry, great prosperity and grinding poverty – the handful of streets that constitute modern Spitalfields have witnessed all this and much more. In Spitalfields, one of Britain's best-loved historians tells the stories of the streets he has lived in for four decades. Starting in Roman times and continuing right up to the present day, Cruickshank explains how Spitalfields' streets evolved, what people have lived there, and what lives they have led. En route, he discovers the tales of the Huguenot weavers who made Spitalfields their own after the Great Fire of London. He recounts the experiences of the first Jewish immigrants. He evokes the slum-ridden courts and alleys of Jack the Ripper's Spitalfields. And he describes the transformation of the Spitalfields he first encountered in the 1970s from a war-damaged collection of semi-derelict houses to the vibrant community it is today. This is a fascinating evocation of one of London's most distinctive districts. At the same time, it is a history of England in miniature.

Death and the City

Death and the City PDF Author: David Charnick
Publisher: Lulu.com
ISBN: 1291288465
Category : Fiction
Languages : en
Pages : 210

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What happens when put-upon prostitutes and workhouse inmates take revenge, or when a royal corpse goes walkabout? Why do the dead call to us, and who are they anyway? These twelve stories, written by a life-long Londoner, introduce us to the dead of London. We hear their voices, and through them we understand our place within the ongoing narrative of history. Just as we remember them, so one day we will be remembered. The author draws on London's folk history, each story being based on a place or institution which has been part of the local history he has learned since childhood. As such, each one bears a ring of authenticity, both in its historical detail and in its place in London's story.

The Cultural Construction of London's East End

The Cultural Construction of London's East End PDF Author: Paul Newland
Publisher: Rodopi
ISBN: 9042024542
Category : Architecture
Languages : en
Pages : 321

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Book Description
Paul Newland's illuminating study explores the ways in which London's East End has been constituted in a wide variety of texts - films, novels, poetry, television shows, newspapers and journals. Newland argues that an idea or image of the East End, which developed during the late nineteenth century, continues to function in the twenty-first century as an imaginative space in which continuing anxieties continue to be worked through concerning material progress and modernity, rationality and irrationality, ethnicity and 'Otherness', class and its related systems of behaviour.The Cultural Construction of London's East End offers detailed examinations of the ways in which the East End has been constructed in a range of texts including BBC Television's EastEnders, Monica Ali's Brick Lane, Walter Besant's All Sorts and Conditions of Men, Thomas Burke's Limehouse Nights, Peter Ackroyd's Hawksmoor, films such as Piccadilly, Sparrows Can't Sing, The Long Good Friday, From Hell, The Elephant Man, and Spider, and in the work of Iain Sinclair.

London: City of the Dead

London: City of the Dead PDF Author: David Brandon
Publisher: The History Press
ISBN: 0752496174
Category : History
Languages : en
Pages : 256

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London: City of the Dead is a groundbreaking account of London's dealing with death, covering the afterlife, execution, bodysnatching, murder, fatal disease, spiritualism, bizarre deaths and cemeteries. Taking the reader from Roman London to the 'glorious dead' of the First World War, this is the first systematic look at London's culture of death, with analysis of its customs and superstitions, rituals and representations. The authors of the celebrated London: The Executioner's City (Sutton, 2006) weave their way through the streets of London once again, this time combining some of the capital's most curious features, such as London's Necropolis Railway and Brookwood Cemetery, with the culture of death exposed in the works of great writers such as Dickens. The book captures for the first time a side of the city that has always been every bit as fascinating and colourful as other better known aspects of the metropolis. It shows London in all its moods - serious, comic, tragic and heroic-and celebrates its robust acceptance of the only certainty in life.

London's Hidden Burial Grounds

London's Hidden Burial Grounds PDF Author: Robert Bard
Publisher: Amberley Publishing Limited
ISBN: 1445661128
Category : Architecture
Languages : en
Pages : 96

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Book Description
Uncovers the dark secrets of London's lost and forgotten burial places.

The Materiality and Spatiality of Death, Burial and Commemoration

The Materiality and Spatiality of Death, Burial and Commemoration PDF Author: Christoph Klaus Streb
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1000460800
Category : Social Science
Languages : en
Pages : 142

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Book Description
Death, dying and burial produce artefacts and occur in spatial contexts. The interplay between such materiality and the bereaved who commemorate the dead yields interpretations and creates meanings that can change over time. Materiality is more than simple matter, void of meaning or relevance. The apparent inanimate has meaning. It is charged with significance, has symbolic and interpretative value—perhaps a form of selfhood, which originates from the interaction with the animate. In our case, gravestones, bodily remains and the spatial order of the cemetery are explored for their material agency and relational constellations with human perceptions and actions. Consciously and unconsciously, by interacting with such materiality, one is creating meaning, while materiality retroactively provides a form of agency. Spatiality provides more than a mere context: it permits and shapes such interaction. Thus, artefacts, mementos and memorials are exteriorised, materialised, and spatialized forms of human activity: they can be understood as cultural forms, the function of which is to sustain social life. However, they are also the medium through which values, ideas and criteria of social distinction are reproduced, legitimised, or transformed. This book will explore this interplay by going beyond the consideration of simple grave artefacts on the one hand and graveyards as a space on the other hand, to examine the specific interrelationships between materiality, spatiality, the living, and the dead. The chapters in this book were originally published as a special issue of the journal Mortality.

London in the Roman World

London in the Roman World PDF Author: Dominic Perring
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 0191093424
Category : Social Science
Languages : en
Pages : 320

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Book Description
incAn original, authoritative survey of the archaeology and history of Roman London. London in the Roman World draws on the results of latest archaeological discoveries to describe London's Roman origins. It presents a wealth of new information from one of the world's richest and most intensively studied archaeological sites, and a host of original ideas concerning its economic and political history. This original study follows a narrative approach, setting archaeological data firmly within its historical context. London was perhaps converted from a fort built at the time of the Roman conquest, where the emperor Claudius arrived to celebrate his victory in AD 43, to become the commanding city from which Rome supported its military occupation of Britain. London grew to support Rome's campaigning forces, and the book makes a close study of the political and economic consequences of London's role as a supply base. Rapid growth generated a new urban landscape, and this study provides a comprehensive guide to the industry and architecture of the city. The story, traced from new archaeological research, shows how the city was twice destroyed in war, and suffered more lastingly from plagues of the second and third centuries. These events had a critical bearing on the reforms of late antiquity, from which London emerged as a defended administrative enclave only to be deserted when Rome failed to maintain political control. This ground-breaking study brings new information and arguments to our study of the way in which Rome ruled, and how the empire failed.