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The Invention of the Modern Dog

The Invention of the Modern Dog PDF Author: Michael Worboys
Publisher: JHU Press
ISBN: 1421426595
Category : Science
Languages : en
Pages : 301

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Book Description
The story of the thoroughly Victorian origins of dog breeds. For centuries, different types of dogs were bred around the world for work, sport, or companionship. But it was not until Victorian times that breeders started to produce discrete, differentiated, standardized breeds. In The Invention of the Modern Dog, Michael Worboys, Julie-Marie Strange, and Neil Pemberton explore when, where, why, and how Victorians invented the modern way of ordering and breeding dogs. Though talk of "breed" was common before this period in the context of livestock, the modern idea of a dog breed defined in terms of shape, size, coat, and color arose during the Victorian period in response to a burgeoning competitive dog show culture. The authors explain how breeders, exhibitors, and showmen borrowed ideas of inheritance and pure blood, as well as breeding practices of livestock, horse, poultry and other fancy breeders, and applied them to a species that was long thought about solely in terms of work and companionship. The new dog breeds embodied and reflected key aspects of Victorian culture, and they quickly spread across the world, as some of Britain’s top dogs were taken on stud tours or exported in a growing international trade. Connecting the emergence and development of certain dog breeds to both scientific understandings of race and blood as well as Britain’s posture in a global empire, The Invention of the Modern Dog demonstrates that studying dog breeding cultures allows historians to better understand the complex social relationships of late-nineteenth-century Britain.

The Invention of the Modern Dog

The Invention of the Modern Dog PDF Author: Michael Worboys
Publisher: JHU Press
ISBN: 1421426595
Category : Science
Languages : en
Pages : 301

View

Book Description
The story of the thoroughly Victorian origins of dog breeds. For centuries, different types of dogs were bred around the world for work, sport, or companionship. But it was not until Victorian times that breeders started to produce discrete, differentiated, standardized breeds. In The Invention of the Modern Dog, Michael Worboys, Julie-Marie Strange, and Neil Pemberton explore when, where, why, and how Victorians invented the modern way of ordering and breeding dogs. Though talk of "breed" was common before this period in the context of livestock, the modern idea of a dog breed defined in terms of shape, size, coat, and color arose during the Victorian period in response to a burgeoning competitive dog show culture. The authors explain how breeders, exhibitors, and showmen borrowed ideas of inheritance and pure blood, as well as breeding practices of livestock, horse, poultry and other fancy breeders, and applied them to a species that was long thought about solely in terms of work and companionship. The new dog breeds embodied and reflected key aspects of Victorian culture, and they quickly spread across the world, as some of Britain’s top dogs were taken on stud tours or exported in a growing international trade. Connecting the emergence and development of certain dog breeds to both scientific understandings of race and blood as well as Britain’s posture in a global empire, The Invention of the Modern Dog demonstrates that studying dog breeding cultures allows historians to better understand the complex social relationships of late-nineteenth-century Britain.

The Invention of the Modern Dog

The Invention of the Modern Dog PDF Author: Michael Worboys
Publisher: Johns Hopkins University Press
ISBN: 1421426587
Category : Science
Languages : en
Pages : 301

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Book Description
Connecting the emergence and development of certain dog breeds to both scientific understandings of race and blood as well as Britain’s posture in a global empire, The Invention of the Modern Dog demonstrates that studying dog breeding cultures allows historians to better understand the complex social relationships of late-nineteenth-century Britain.

The Modern Dog

The Modern Dog PDF Author: Stanley Coren
Publisher: Simon and Schuster
ISBN: 1416593683
Category : Pets
Languages : en
Pages : 290

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Book Description
Evaluates the cultural, literary, religious, and economic ways in which the human race has shaped its relationship with dogs throughout the past 15,000 years, sharing stories of how dogs have become entangled in human political, legal, and evolutionary processes.

Modern Dog Parenting

Modern Dog Parenting PDF Author: Sarah Hodgson
Publisher: St. Martin's Griffin
ISBN: 1250095557
Category : Pets
Languages : en
Pages : 288

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Book Description
You and your dog are a lot alike. By several behavioral measures, your dog’s mental abilities are equivalent to those of a two to three and a half-year-old toddler. Dogs can learn up to 250 words, count from one to five and understand basic arithmetic. Your dog can imitate and understand your behavior and has a sense of fairness. Doesn’t it make sense to treat these sensitive, intelligent creatures a bit more like children? Kids—and dogs—raised with kindness and respect grow up happy. And happy is good. Modern Dog Parenting will show readers that yes, you can love your dog and live with him, too. Dogs (and the people who love them) are tired of the school of dominant, top-dog training. They are looking for a new kind of pack leader: someone funny, enthusiastic, intuitive, approachable, and, above all, effective. And they’ve found her. Sarah Hodgson rejects dominance-based training and gets astonishing results with a blend of wit, compassion, energy, and proven skills. She communicates instructions clearly, directs behavior compassionately, and rewards success lavishly. Topics include: *Understanding the signs your dog is giving you *Having fun while learning manners *How to fit your dog into your lifestyle *How to communicate lovingly and effectively with your dog

Canis Modernis

Canis Modernis PDF Author: Karalyn Kendall-Morwick
Publisher: Penn State Press
ISBN: 0271088400
Category : Literary Criticism
Languages : en
Pages : 217

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Book Description
Modernist literature might well be accused of going to the dogs. From the strays wandering the streets of Dublin in James Joyce’s Ulysses to the highbred canine subject of Virginia Woolf’s Flush, dogs populate a range of modernist texts. In many ways, the dog in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries became a potent symbol of the modern condition—facing, like the human species, the problem of adapting to modernizing forces that relentlessly outpaced it. Yet the dog in literary modernism does not function as a stand-in for the human. In this book, Karalyn Kendall-Morwick examines the human-dog relationship in modernist works by Virginia Woolf, Jack London, Albert Payson Terhune, J. R. Ackerley, and Samuel Beckett, among others. Drawing from the evolutionary theories of Charles Darwin and the scientific, literary, and philosophical work of Donna Haraway, Temple Grandin, and Carrie Rohman, she makes a case for the dog as a coevolutionary and coadapting partner of humans. As our coevolutionary partners, dogs destabilize the human: not the autonomous, self-transparent subject of Western humanism, the human is instead contingent, shaped by its material interactions with other species. By demonstrating how modernist representations of dogs ultimately mongrelize the human, this book reveals dogs’ status both as instigators of the crisis of the modern subject and as partners uniquely positioned to help humans adapt to the turbulent forces of modernization. Accessibly written and convincingly argued, this study shows how dogs challenge the autonomy of the human subject and the humanistic underpinnings of traditional literary forms. It will find favor with students and scholars of modernist literature and animal studies.

Wonderdog

Wonderdog PDF Author: Jules Howard
Publisher: Simon and Schuster
ISBN: 1639362630
Category : Pets
Languages : en
Pages : 174

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Book Description
A celebration of dogs, the scientists who've lived alongside them, and how canines have been key to advancements in science for the betterment of all species. Almost everywhere there are humans on planet Earth, there are dogs. But what do dogs know and understand of the world? Do their emotions feel like our own? Do they love like we do? What do they think of us? Since our alliance first began on the hunt and on the farm, our relationship with dogs has evolved considerably. And with domestic dog population rising twenty per cent in the last decade alone, it is a bond that will continue to evolve. In order to gauge where our relationship with dogs goes from here, author and zoologist Jules Howard takes a look at the historical paths we have trod together, and at the many scientists before him who turned their analytic eye on their own four-legged companions. Charles Darwin and his contemporaries toyed with dog sign language and made special puzzle boxes and elaborate sniff tests using old socks. Later, the same questions drove Pavlov and Pasteur to unspeakable cruelty in their search for knowledge. Since then, leagues of psychologists and animal behaviourists have built upon the study of dogs and their much-improved methods have fetched increasingly important results: dogs have episodic memory similar to ours; they recognise themselves as individuals; and, in addition to their expert sense of smell, dogs’ noses can even detect thermal radiation. With the help of vets, ethologists, neurologists, historians and, naturally, his own dogs, Wonderdog reveals the study of dogs to be key in the advancement of compassion in scientific research, and crucial to making life on Earth better for all species.

What's a Dog For?

What's a Dog For? PDF Author: John Homans
Publisher: Penguin
ISBN: 1101596279
Category : Pets
Languages : en
Pages : 272

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Book Description
John Homans adopted his dog, Stella, from a shelter for all the usual reasons: fond memories of dogs from his past, a companion for his son, an excuse for long walks around the neighborhood. Soon enough, she is happily ensconced in the daily workings of his family. And not only that: Stella is treated like a family member—in ways that dogs of his youth were not. Spending humanlike sums on vet bills, questioning her diet and exercise regimens, contemplating her happiness—how had this all come to pass, when the dogs from Homans’s childhood seemed quite content living mostly out in the yard? In What’s a Dog For?, Homans explores the dog’s complex and prominent place in our world and how it came to be. Evolving from wild animals to working animals to nearly human members of our social fabric, dogs are now the subject of serious scientific studies concerning pet ownership, evolutionary theory, and even cognitive science. From new insights into what makes dogs so appealing to humans to the health benefits associated with owning a dog, Homans investigates why the human-canine relationship has evolved so rapidly—how dogs moved into our families, our homes, and sometimes even our beds in the span of a generation, becoming a $53 billion industry in the United States in the process. As dogs take their place as coddled family members and their numbers balloon to more than seventy-seven million in the United States alone, it’s no surprise that canine culture at large is also undergoing a massive transformation. They are now subject to many of the same questions of rights and ethics as people, and the politics of dogs are more tumultuous and public than ever— with fierce moral battles raging over kill shelters, puppy mills, and breed standards. Incorporating interviews and research from scientists, activists, breeders, and trainers, What’s a Dog For? investigates how dogs have reached this exalted status and why they hold such fascination for us. With one paw in the animal world and one paw in the human world, it turns out they have much to teach us about love, death, and morality—and ultimately, in their closeness and difference, about what it means to be human.

A Dog's World

A Dog's World PDF Author: Jessica Pierce
Publisher: Princeton University Press
ISBN: 0691247749
Category : Nature
Languages : en
Pages : 240

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Book Description
From two of the world’s leading authorities on dogs, an imaginative journey into a future of dogs without people What would happen to dogs if humans simply disappeared? Would dogs be able to survive on their own without us? A Dog’s World imagines a posthuman future for dogs, revealing how dogs would survive—and possibly even thrive—and explaining how this new and revolutionary perspective can guide how we interact with dogs now. Drawing on biology, ecology, and the latest findings on the lives and behavior of dogs and their wild relatives, Jessica Pierce and Marc Bekoff—two of today’s most innovative thinkers about dogs—explore who dogs might become without direct human intervention into breeding, arranged playdates at the dog park, regular feedings, and veterinary care. Pierce and Bekoff show how dogs are quick learners who are highly adaptable and opportunistic, and they offer compelling evidence that dogs already do survive on their own—and could do so in a world without us. Challenging the notion that dogs would be helpless without their human counterparts, A Dog’s World enables us to understand these independent and remarkably intelligent animals on their own terms.

Made to Order

Made to Order PDF Author: Margaret E. Derry
Publisher: University of Toronto Press
ISBN: 1487541635
Category : Technology & Engineering
Languages : en
Pages : 264

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Book Description
Animal breeding has been complicated by persisting factors across species, cultures, geography, and time. In Made to Order, Margaret E. Derry explains these factors and other breeding concerns in relation to both animals and society in North America and Europe over the past three centuries. Made to Order addresses how breeding methodology evolved, what characterized the aims of breeding, and the way structures were put in place to regulate the occupation. Illustrated by case studies on important farm animals and companion species, the book presents a synthetic overview of livestock breeding as a whole. It gives considerable emphasis to genetics and animal breeding in the post-1960 period, the relationship between environmental and improvement breeding, and regulation of breeding as seen through pedigrees. In doing so, Made to Order shows how studying the ancient human practice of animal breeding can illuminate the ways in which human thinking, theorizing, and evolving characterize our interactions with all-natural processes.

The Remunerative Dog Breeding Business

The Remunerative Dog Breeding Business PDF Author: Dr John Tyler
Publisher:
ISBN:
Category :
Languages : en
Pages : 92

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Book Description
Modern dog breeds were created in Victorian Britain. The evolution of the domestic dog goes back tens of thousands of years. however, the multiple forms we see today are just 150 years old. Before the Victorian era, there were different types of dog, but there were not that many and they were largely defined by their function. They were like the colors of a rainbow: variations within each type, shading into each other at the margins. And many terms were used for the different dogs: breed, kind, race, sort, strain, type, and variety.By the time the Victorian era came to an end, only one term was used breed. This was more than a change in language. Dog breeds were something entirely new, defined by their form and not their function. With the invention of breed, the different types became like the blocks on a paint color card discrete, uniform, and standardized. The greater differentiation of breeds increased their number. In the 1840s, just two types of terrier were recognized; by the end of the Victorian period, there were 10, and proliferation continued today there are 27.The advent of dog shows drove the creation of breed. The groups running these events and driving changes were styled the "dog fancy," and the aficionados of the new canines "doggy people." Breed standards were contingent and contested, decided as competitions selected the best dogs in each class. Owners gained prestige, and some income, from sales and stud fees. Competition at shows and in the market drove specialization, in the specification of ideal forms; standardization, in the designs of physical conformations; objectification, in viewing dogs' bodies as made up of parts; commodification, in promoting dogs as tradable goods; differentiation, in the proliferation of breeds; and alienation, as ability and character became secondary to form.The templates for breed conformation standards drew upon history, art, natural history, physiology and anatomy, and aesthetics. There was a tension in breeding between earned and inherited worth, that is, between "best in breed" winners, chosen in competitions, and "pure blood" dogs with pedigrees showing superior inheritance.This tension points to the divisions among doggy people who were gentlemen-amateurs, and those who were trader-professionals. The former, predominantly from the upper classes, defined themselves as "dog lovers." They were men (few women were active in the dog fancy until the 1890s), who were themselves of the right breeding, to use their parlance. They claimed to be interested only in the long-term improvement of the nation's dogs, and saw themselves in a struggle against entrepreneurs, whom they styled as "dog dealers," interested only in short-term profit and social success.