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From the Ghetto to the Melting Pot PDF Download

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From the Ghetto to the Melting Pot

From the Ghetto to the Melting Pot PDF Author: Israel Zangwill
Publisher: Wayne State University Press
ISBN: 9780814329559
Category : DRAMA
Languages : en
Pages : 580

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Book Description
Three plays by Israel Zangwill, a noted Jewish playwright, published together for the first time in their original form and accompanied by extensive scholarly commentary.

From the Ghetto to the Melting Pot

From the Ghetto to the Melting Pot PDF Author: Israel Zangwill
Publisher: Wayne State University Press
ISBN: 9780814329559
Category : DRAMA
Languages : en
Pages : 580

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Book Description
Three plays by Israel Zangwill, a noted Jewish playwright, published together for the first time in their original form and accompanied by extensive scholarly commentary.

The Melting Pot in Israel

The Melting Pot in Israel PDF Author: Zvi Zameret
Publisher: SUNY Press
ISBN: 9780791452554
Category : Political Science
Languages : en
Pages : 356

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Book Description
Covers early Israeli education policy regarding immigrant populations.

The Bully Pulpit and the Melting Pot

The Bully Pulpit and the Melting Pot PDF Author: Hans P. Vought
Publisher: Mercer University Press
ISBN: 9780865548879
Category : History
Languages : en
Pages : 261

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Book Description
Drawing on presidential speeches, letters, and administrative and archival records, a study of the attitudes of the presidents toward immigrants reflects the chief executives' support for a melting pot model rather than a nativism racism, addressing the specific policies of the presidents from McKinley through Hoover.

Melting-Pot Modernism

Melting-Pot Modernism PDF Author: Sarah Wilson
Publisher: Cornell University Press
ISBN: 080145817X
Category : Literary Criticism
Languages : en
Pages : 264

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Book Description
Between 1891 and 1920 more than 18 million immigrants entered the United States. While many Americans responded to this influx by proposing immigration restriction or large-scale "Americanization" campaigns, a few others, figures such as Jane Addams and John Dewey, adopted the image of the melting pot to oppose such measures. These Progressives imagined assimilation as a multidirectional process, in which both native-born and immigrants contributed their cultural gifts to a communal fund. Melting-Pot Modernism reveals the richly aesthetic nature of assimilation at the turn of the twentieth century, focusing on questions of the individual's relation to culture, the protection of vulnerable populations, the sharing of cultural heritages, and the far-reaching effects of free-market thinking. By tracing the melting-pot impulse toward merging and cross-fertilization through the writings of Henry James, James Weldon Johnson, Willa Cather, and Gertrude Stein, as well as through the autobiography, sociology, and social commentary of their era, Sarah Wilson makes a new connection between the ideological ferment of the Progressive era and the literary experimentation of modernism. Wilson puts literary analysis at the service of intellectual history, showing that literary modes of thought and expression both shaped and were shaped by debates over cultural assimilation. Exploring the depth and nuance of an earlier moment's commitment to cultural inclusiveness, Melting-Pot Modernism gives new meaning to American struggles to imaginatively encompass difference—and to the central place of literary interpretation in understanding such struggles.

The Melting Pot

The Melting Pot PDF Author: Natashya Wilson
Publisher: The Rosen Publishing Group
ISBN: 144885783X
Category : Juvenile Nonfiction
Languages : en
Pages : 27

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Book Description
The diverse peoples and cultures who call New York home are a huge part of what makes the state so unique. This book delves into the history of immigration in New York and the different cultures that have helped shape New York into the state it is today. Thoughtful text is supplemented by primary source documents and photographs that show New York in the past and as it is today

The Melting-Pot

The Melting-Pot PDF Author: Israel Zangwill
Publisher: e-artnow
ISBN:
Category : Drama
Languages : en
Pages : 97

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Book Description
The Melting-Pot depicts the life of a Russian Jewish immigrant family, the Quixanos. David Quixano has survived a pogrom, which killed his mother and sister, and he wishes to forget this horrible event. He composes an "American Symphony" and wants to look forward to a society free of ethnic divisions and hatred, rather than backward at his traumatic past.

Reinventing the Melting Pot

Reinventing the Melting Pot PDF Author: Tamar Jacoby
Publisher: Hachette UK
ISBN: 0786729732
Category : Social Science
Languages : en
Pages : 144

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Book Description
Nothing happening in America today will do more to affect our children's future than the wave of new immigrants flooding into the country, mostly from the developing world. Already, one in ten Americans is foreign-born, and if one counts their children, one-fifth of the population can be considered immigrants. Will these newcomers make it in the U.S? Or will today's realities -- from identity politics to cheap and easy international air travel -- mean that the age-old American tradition of absorption and assimilation no longer applies? Reinventing the Melting Pot is a conversation among two dozen of the thinkers who have looked longest and hardest at the issue of how immigrants assimilate: scholars, journalists, and fiction writers, on both the left and the right. The contributors consider virtually every aspect of the issue and conclude that, of course, assimilation can and must work again -- but for that to happen, we must find new ways to think and talk about it. Contributors to Reinventing the Melting Pot include Michael Barone, Stanley Crouch, Herbert Gans, Nathan Glazer, Michael Lind, Orlando Patterson, Gregory Rodriguez, and Stephan Thernstrom.

Zionism and the Melting Pot

Zionism and the Melting Pot PDF Author: Matthew Mark Silver
Publisher: University Alabama Press
ISBN: 0817320628
Category : Religion
Languages : en
Pages : 368

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Book Description
Traces the roots of ideologies and outlooks that shape Jewish life in Israel and the United States today Zionism and the Melting Pot pivots away from commonplace accounts of the origins of Jewish politics and focuses on the ongoing activities of actors instrumental in the theological, political, diplomatic, and philanthropic networks that enabled the establishment of new Jewish communities in Palestine and the United States. M. M. Silver’s innovative new study highlights the grassroots nature of these actors and their efforts—preaching, fundraising, emigration campaigns, and mutual aid organizations—and argues that these activities were not fundamentally ideological in nature but instead grew organically from traditional Judaic customs, values, and community mores. Silver examines events in three key locales—Ottoman Palestine, czarist Russia and the United States—during a period from the early 1870s to a few years before World War I. This era which was defined by the rise of new forms of anti-Semitism and by mass Jewish migration, ended with institutional and artistic expressions of new perspectives on Zionism and American Jewish communal life. Within this timeframe, Silver demonstrates, Jewish ideologies arose somewhat amorphously, without clear agendas; they then evolved as attempts to influence the character, pace, and geographical coordinates of the modernization of East European Jews, particularly in, or from, Russia’s czarist empire. Unique in his multidisciplinary approach, Silver combines political and diplomatic history, literary analysis, biography, and organizational history. Chapters switch successively from the Zionist context, both in the czarist and Ottoman empires, to the United States’ melting-pot milieu. More than half of the figures discussed are sermonizers, emissaries, pioneers, or writers unknown to most readers. And for well-known figures like Theodor Herzl or Emma Lazarus, Silver’s analysis typically relates to texts and episodes that are not covered in extant scholarship. By uncovering the foundations of Zionism—the Jewish nationalist ideology that became organized formally as a political movement—and of melting-pot theories of Jewish integration in the United States, Zionism and the Melting Pot breaks ample new ground.

Into the Melting Pot

Into the Melting Pot PDF Author: Unn Pedersen
Publisher: Aarhus Universitetsforlag
ISBN: 8771845070
Category : History
Languages : en
Pages : 222

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Book Description
This volume examines workshop waste and discusses the craftspeople in the Viking town of Kaupang including their activities, crafted products, raw materials, skills and networks. The study focuses on artefacts used in non-ferrous metalworking: crucibles, moulds, matrix dies, tuyeres and a unique collection of lead models.The tools and the waste material provide a completely new understanding of the craftspeople who were working with gold, silver, copper alloys, lead and tin. These metalworkers mastered many different materials and techniques; indeed, they were well-informed, well-trained and skillful, and manufactured a range of different items for women and men. There is every reason to believe that visitors and residents perceived the non-ferrous metalworking as a defining feature of the Viking-period town. The combination of excavations and surface surveys has produced a broad and diverse collection of material very similar to finds in different Viking-period towns in Scandinavia including Ribe, Birka and Hedeby. The finds show that Kaupang was an important centre for the production of jewelry, and the craftsmen appear to have had access to a range of high quality raw materials including brass and kaolin clay. Their activity can be traced from the earliest layers of the beginning of the 9th Century to the early 10th Century. Altogether, the production waste from Kaupang illustrates how a range of different social groups were involved in the process of forging an urban identity.

Out of the Melting Pot, Into the Fire

Out of the Melting Pot, Into the Fire PDF Author: Jens Kurt Heycke
Publisher: Encounter Books
ISBN: 1641773200
Category : Social Science
Languages : en
Pages : 169

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Book Description
The melting pot has been the prevailing ideal for integrating new citizens through most of America’s history, yet contemporary elites often reject it as antiquated and racist. Instead, they advocate multiculturalism, which promotes ethnic boundaries and distinct group identities. Both models have precedents across the centuries, as Jens Heycke demonstrates in a contribution to the debate that incorporates an international, historical perspective. Heycke surveys multiethnic polities in history, focusing on societies that have shifted between the melting pot and multicultural models. Beginning with ancient Rome, he demonstrates the appeal of a unifying, syncretic identity that diverse individuals can join, regardless of their ethnic or racial origins. He details how early Islam, with its ideal of an inclusive ummah, integrated diverse groups, and even different faiths, into a cohesive and flourishing society. Both civilizations eventually abandoned their integrative ideals in favor of a multicultural paradigm. The consequences of that paradigm shift are instructive for societies that seek to emulate it. In the modern era, many nations have implemented multicultural policies like group preferences to compensate for past injustices or current disparities. Heycke examines some notable examples: Yugoslavia, Rwanda, and Sri Lanka. These nations were on a rough trajectory toward ethnic tolerance and comity, a trajectory that multicultural policies altered dramatically. They contrast with Botswana, a country that opposes group distinctions so resolutely that it prohibits the collection of racial and ethnic statistics. Since World War II, ethnic conflicts have killed over ten million people. But the consequences of ethnic division go far beyond that. Heycke analyzes those consequences in an international statistical survey of ethnic fractionalization. This survey, combined with the extensive historical record of multiethnic societies, illustrates the staggering costs of accentuating group differences and the benefits of a unifying identity that transcends those differences.